MMG WEEKLY – WHAT ARE THEY SAYING THIS WEEK?

MMG Weekly / Vantage Production.blueForecast for the Week

This week’s economic calendar features a broad array of reports that span a big portion of the U.S. economy.

  • Economic data kicks off on Monday with Personal Income, Personal Spending, and the inflation-reading Personal Consumption Expenditures.
  • The ISM Manufacturing Index and the ISM Services Index will be released on Monday and Wednesday, respectively. Also on Wednesday, look for the Federal Reserve’s Beige Book, which can serve as a helpful indicator to the Fed’s decisions on monetary policy.
  • In labor market news, the ADP Employment Report will be delivered on Wednesday, followed by weekly Initial Jobless Claims on Thursday. Worker Productivity will also be reported on Thursday.
  • That leads us to Friday’s Non-farm Payrolls and the Unemployment Rate, which will be closely dissected by both Wall Street and the Federal Reserve.

Remember: Weak economic news normally causes money to flow out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping Bonds and home loan rates improve, while strong economic news normally has the opposite result. The chart below shows Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS), which are the type of Bond on which home loan rates are based.

When you see these Bond prices moving higher, it means home loan rates are improving — and when they are moving lower, home loan rates are getting worse.

To go one step further — a red “candle” means that MBS worsened during the day, while a green “candle” means MBS improved during the day. Depending on how dramatic the changes were on any given day, this can cause rate changes throughout the day, as well as on the rate sheets we start with each morning.

As you can see in the chart below, Mortgage Bonds had a strong week thanks to investors and some weaker than expected reports. Home loan rates remain near historical lows and I will continue to monitor them closely.

Chart: Fannie Mae 4.0% Mortgage Bond (Friday February 28, 2014)

Japanese Candlestick Chart

The Mortgage Market Guide View…

How to Mix Professional, Personal Posts on Social Media
How do you balance work and play in your social-media posts?

Navigating between personal and professional posts on social media can be like walking through an etiquette minefield. Whether you’re tweeting in 140 characters or posting family vacation photos to Facebook, it’s tough to know which topics are off-limits. “The problem with social media is that it’s relatively new,” says etiquette consultant Jay Remer. “Using it properly hasn’t really caught on yet.”

Should I even bother? Your gut reaction may be to abstain from social media and avoid the issue, but that’s not always smart. Social media is a useful tool. It can promote your business and personal brand, and it can help you network. If you’re not on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter, it may appear that you’re out of touch to a client or recruiter searching your name online.

The nuts and bolts of all these platforms are similar—you publish links, photos and comments—but the expectations are different. A LinkedIn account is for your professional life. Facebook and Twitter give you more wiggle room, with the tone of your posts and bio helping to define them as professional or personal. Remember that objective before each post to keep your profile on-topic and appropriate. If your feed is for personal purposes—keeping in touch with family and friends—then tighten your privacy settings. But private or not, remember that posts and photos can leak, so err on the conservative side.

Can I connect with the boss? Yes, depending on the platform. For example, LinkedIn is almost always appropriate because the site is for professional contacts. Following a professional page on Facebook is fine (you’ll recognize a professional profile by its “likes” or “followers”). But don’t “friend” a boss or subordinate.

Twitter falls somewhere in between, because professionals may use it for networking or posting work-related links and comments. Take a cue from the kind of content a co-worker posts. And if you don’t feel comfortable accepting a “friend” or “follow” request from a co-worker, you don’t have to accept it.

Can I post personal updates on my professional account? You should – with a few caveats. A steady stream of professional posts can be boring and robotic. An occasional personal status update spices up and humanizes your feed. The trick is to draw the line between sharing and oversharing. Choose a topic or two—say, biking and music—and restrict lifestyle posts to those subjects. Your followers will know what kinds of personal updates to expect from you without feeling overwhelmed by intimate details.

By Susannah Snider, Kiplinger.com

Reprinted with permission. All Contents ©2014 The Kiplinger Washington Editors. www.kiplinger.com.

Economic Calendar for the Week of March 03 – March 07

Date
ET
Economic Report
For
Estimate
Actual
Prior
Impact
Mon. March 03
08:30
Personal Income
Jan
NA
0.0%
Moderate
Mon. March 03
08:30
Personal Spending
Jan
NA
0.4%
Moderate
Mon. March 03
08:30
Personal Consumption Expenditures and Core PCE
Jan
NA
0.1%
Moderate
Mon. March 03
08:30
Personal Consumption Expenditures and Core PCE
Jan
NA
1.2%
Moderate
Mon. March 03
10:00
ISM Index
Feb
NA
51.3
HIGH
Wed. March 05
08:15
ADP National Employment Report
Feb
NA
175K
HIGH
Wed. March 05
10:00
ISM Services Index
Feb
NA
54.0
Moderate
Wed. March 05
02:00
Beige Book
Mar
NA
NA
Moderate
Thu. March 06
08:30
Jobless Claims (Initial)
3/01
NA
NA
Moderate
Thu. March 06
08:30
Productivity
Q4
NA
3.2%
Moderate
Fri. March 07
08:30
Non-farm Payrolls
Feb
NA
113K
HIGH
Fri. March 07
08:30
Unemployment Rate
Feb
NA
6.6%
HIGH
Fri. March 07
08:30
Average Work Week
Feb
NA
34.4
HIGH
Fri. March 07
08:30
Hourly Earnings
Feb
NA
0.2%
HIGH

The material contained in this newsletter is provided by a third party to real estate, financial services and other professionals only for their use and the use of their clients. The material provided is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment and/or mortgage advice. Although the material is deemed to be accurate and reliable, we do not make any representations as to its accuracy or completeness and as a result, there is no guarantee it is without errors.

Mortgage Market Guide, LLC is the copyright owner or licensee of the content and/or information in this email, unless otherwise indicated. Mortgage Market Guide, LLC does not grant to you a license to any content, features or materials in this email. You may not distribute, download, or save a copy of any of the content or screens except as otherwise provided in our Terms and Conditions of Membership, for any purpose.

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